Loop By Claridge (70 Gloucester)
Image
70Gloucester_BannerSize-02_2270x1335
Location
Ottawa, ON
Project Size
582,100 sq. ft.
Year Completed
2021

Innovative energy recovery.

Loop By Claridge is a residential development consisting of two towers at 70 Gloucester and 89 Nepean in Ottawa. Both towers are 28-storeys and share a podium that includes amenity spaces, such as ground floor pool and fitness areas. Affordable housing units are offered as part of this development.

Smith + Andersen provided mechanical engineering and electrical engineering for this project, as well as sustainability services. Our mechanical and electrical design contributed to the targeted 50 per cent reduction in energy (compared to the baseline building).

Innovative energy recovery.

Loop By Claridge is a residential development consisting of two towers at 70 Gloucester and 89 Nepean in Ottawa. Both towers are 28-storeys and share a podium that includes amenity spaces, such as ground floor pool and fitness areas. Affordable housing units are offered as part of this development.

Smith + Andersen provided mechanical engineering and electrical engineering for this project, as well as sustainability services. Our mechanical and electrical design contributed to the targeted 50 per cent reduction in energy (compared to the baseline building).

70 Gloucester features a hybrid geothermal and heat pump system for heating and cooling throughout the building. A heat pump extracts from the geothermal loop in the winter, and a heat exchanger is used to reject heat from the building’s heat pumps in the summer. The energy recovery units feature a heat transfer surface that separates the outdoor and exhaust air streams, as well as provide an energy recovery of more than 50 per cent with minimal cross contamination. The custom design on the building automation control system (BAS) optimizes the operations of 70 Gloucester.

In addition, the design utilized wastewater heat recovery to save significant energy by extracting heat through a sewer drainage system in order to pre-heat the domestic hot water. The domestic hot water recirculation system uses heating exchangers (rather than electric heaters) for further energy efficiency. A slab-on grade generator is leveraged for both towers.

Due to the project being completed in phases, each tower had independent construction timelines. To accommodate this, the team designed the incoming switchboard (fed from the Hydro Ottawa vault equipment) to provide each tower with separate power distribution and metering systems from the same source. The lighting design utilized fixtures supplied by the owner as much as possible.